Dating gibson eh 150

It is known informally as the "fry pan", due to it's shape.

Like the best of all pre-war Rickenbachers, the fry pan has a 1 1/2" wide "horse-shoe" pickup, which is considered to be one of the best sounding pickups of any made to date.

In 1944, Gibson was bought by Chicago Musical Instruments (CMI) which was acquired in 1969 by Panama-based conglomerate, Ecuadorian Company Limited (E. L.) that changed its name in the same year to Norlin Corporation.

Gibson sells guitars under a variety of brand names and builds one of the world's most iconic guitars, the Gibson Les Paul. Gibson was at the forefront of innovation in acoustic guitars, especially in the big band era of the 1930s; the Gibson Super 400 was widely imitated.

dating gibson eh 150-78dating gibson eh 150-12dating gibson eh 150-29dating gibson eh 150-78

It was expected that the entire bolt on neck would be replaced when the frets wore. Serial number B5 1948 Fender Deluxe 8 Lap Steel Guitar Available in 1946.

*) AC/DC version was available, sometimes known as EH-110. **) AC/DC version was available, sometimes known as EH-160 (one sample can be found in Aspen Pittman's book, 3-6C5, 4-26B6, 4-25Z5). ***) AC/DC version, known as EH-195 was also available GA-77 Vanguard: 12AY7, 12AX7, 12AU7, 2-6L6, 5V4 GA-70: 12AX7, 12AY7, 12AU7, 2-6L6, 5V4 GA-55: 2-12AY7, 6SC7, 2-6L6, 5V4 GA-45 Maestro: 2-5879, 6SQ7, 12AX7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 (essentially a GA-40 with bass & treble tone controls and different speaker configuration)GA-40 Les Paul: 2-5879, 12AX7, 6SQ7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-30 Invader: 2-12AX7, 12AU7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-20: 4-12AX7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 (correspond to Epiphone EA-25 Century) GA-20T: 5879, 12AY7, 12AX7, 6SQ7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 (correspond to Epiphone EA-25T Century) GA-15: 12AX7, 6SL7, 2-6V6, 5Y3GA-9: 6SJ7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-8 Gibsonette: 12AX7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-8T Gibsonette/Discoverer: 12AX7, 2-6BM8, 5Y3 GA-6: 12AY7, 6SL7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-6 Lancer: 2-12AX7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 (identical to GA-14 Titan except for 12" speaker) GA-5 Skylark: 12AX7, 6V6, 5Y3GA-400 Super-400: 3-12AX7, 12AY7, 2-6BJ8, 2-6SK7, 6V6, 2-6550, GZ34 GA-200 Rhythm King: 2-12AX7, 12AY7, 2-6BJ8, 2-6SK7, 6V6, 2-6550, GZ34 GA-46T: 3-12AX7, 2-5879, 6SN7, 6V6, 2-6550, 5AR4 GA-85: 2-12AX7, 2-5881, 5V6, 5V4GA-100 Bass: 6EU7, 2-6BD6, 2-6FM8, 2-6L6, GZ34, 0A2 (correspond to Epiphone EA-70 Bass-Amp) GA-86 Ensemble: 2-12AX7, 2-5881, 6V6, GZ34 GA-80 Vari-Tone: 2-12AX7, 2-5879, 2-6L6, GZ34 GA-16T Viscount: 2-12AX7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-14 Titan: 2-12AX7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 (identical to GA-6 Lancer except for 10" speaker, and Epiphone EA-30 Triumph)GA-83S Stereo-Vib: 4-12AX7, 12AU7, 3-6CG7, 4-6BQ5, GZ34 GA-88S Stereo-Twin: 3-12AX7, 4-6BQ5, GZ34 GA-87 Maestro Stereo: 3-12AX7, 4-6BQ5, GZ34 GA-78 & 79: 4-6EU7, 4-6BQ6 GA-79RVT Multi-Purpose: 3-6EU7, 7199, 12AU7, 4-6BQ5 GA-78RV Maestro 30: 3-6EU7, 7199, 12AU7, 4-6BQ5GA-1RT: 12AX7, 6BM8, 5Y3 GA-1RVT: 6EU7, 7199, 6BM8, 5Y3 (Aka Maestro M-1RVT) GA-2RT: 4-6EU7, 12AU7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-77RV Vanguard: 3-6EU7, 1-12AU7, 2-6L6GC, 1-GZ34 (5AR4) GA-30RV Invader: 3-6EU7, 12AU7A, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-15RV: 3-6EU7, 12AU7, 2-6V6, 5Y3 GA-19RVT: 3-6EU7, 7199, 2-6V6, 5Y3GA-40T Les Paul: 3-6EU7, 12AU7, 2-7591, 5AR4 GA-60 Hercules: 2-6EU7, 2-7591, 5AR4 (correspond to Epiphone EA-65 Rivoli) GA-18T Explorer: 2-6EU7, 2-6BQ5, 6CA4 GA-8 Discoverer: 6EU7, 6C4, 2-6BQ5, 6CA4 (correspond to Epiphone EA-35 Devon) GA-8T Discoverer: 2-6EU7, 2-6BQ5, 6CA4 (correspond to Epiphone EA-35T Devon) GA-5 Skylark: 6EU7, 6C4, 2-6AQ5, 6X4 (correspond to Epiphone EA-50 Pacemaker) GA-5T Skylark: 2-6EU7, 2-6AQ5, 6X4 (correspond to Epiphone EA-50T Pacemaker) Courtesy of Allan Fredrickson.

GA-77RVT Vanguard: 4-6EU7, 12AU7, 7199, 2-6L6 GA-30RVT Invader: 4-6EU7, 12AU7, 2-7591, 5AR4 (most likely corresponding to Epiphone EA-12RVT Futura) GA-30RVT Invader: 4-6EU7, 2-12AU7, 2-7591, 0A2 GA-19RVT Falcon: 3-6EU7, 6C4, 2-6V6, 5Y3 (both brown and late black models correspond to Maestro M-216RVT and Epiphone EA-28RVT Pathfinder) Courtesy of Matt Lafferty and Jonathan Horne.

Between 1942-1945, Gibson employed women to manufacture guitars.

"Women produced nearly 25,000 guitars during World War II yet Gibson denied ever building instruments over this period," according to a 2013 history of the company.

Leave a Reply